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What We Do

 
 

trauma informed resilience framework - tir

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When entire generations and nations have lived in protracted violence and existed in survival mode for decades, the cracks in society are entrenched. These cracks are reflected in daily life, and not only impact individuals but also the systems and structures that are meant to support recovery.

Through supporting trauma-informed approaches the intractable becomes possible through tapping into the knowledge, skills and values of local communities. A trauma-informed framework is necessary for addressing the ways trauma influences the different aspects of life and society. Such approaches strengthen both individual and community resilience.

 

projects & initiatives

·         Community Empowerment and Resilience Programming

GSN has developed a community-based large scale approach and methodology for promoting the long process of community healing and social reconciliation within diverse cultural landscapes. Integral to the process are community-wide small group dialogues that are organised by local leaders and led by trained community facilitators. 

The dialogue groups meet regularly for a sustained period of time to engage community members in developing stress and trauma awareness, in understanding cycles of violence, and in building capacity for healthier individuals and communities. To support the overall programme and the facilitators, Green String Network has developed a facilitator handbook called “I refuse to be a Victim. I am a Resource for Peace” that uses local images and paintings as a basis for storytelling and dialogue. The facilitator handbook supports a 12-week educational curriculum that includes both an explanation of the foundational principles and learning methods guiding the programme as well as detailed modules that facilitators use in their work with community participants.


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Kenya: Kumekucha: It’s a New Dawn

Kumekucha: It’s a New Dawn is the Kiswahili translation for “it’s a new dawn”. In coastal slang, it also means “something is going down”. The name was selected in order to symbolise a self-awakening, harnessing the idea of a new, energised beginning for Kenya regardless of our past.

Currently the project is working with the Kenyan Office of the President and three local CBOs on the Kenyan coast X, X, X  to pilot the project. If you are interested in further partnering with GSN please get in touch.


 
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Somalia: Quraca Nabadda

The Quraca Nabadda (QN) program in Somalia was designed by two local GSN partners, Somali Youth Development Network (SOYDEN) and Wajir Peace University Trust, to address social healing and wellness. Since its inception, the federal government of Somalia has agreed to have QN implemented as a part of the Wadajir national framework.

Breaking persistent and existing cycles of violence requires constructive dialogue about the past and envisioning a shared future. QN focuses on the cognitive and affective shifts that need to occur for leaders and communities to come together at the peace table and to recognise the experiences and humanity of the ‘other’ clans.  QN fosters such learning spaces, conducted in safe settings and held at national and community levels. These dialogues enable people to come to terms with their experiences, and to move forward in a way that will allow communities to live harmoniously.


 

Ethiopia: 

(We are working on this - coming soon)


 

·         Trauma Informed Approaches with Kenyan Security Actors

GSN acknowledges that leaders in Africa and beyond are exposed to stressful and traumatic events either in their own lives or in the lives of the people they serve. We believe that a healthy and balanced leader can facilitate and animate communities and its people to be resilient in times of hardship and conflict, war or turmoil. It is in this spirit that we want to embark on a trauma-informed training program for the Kenya Police Service. Funded by the US State Department, this Trauma-Informed Initiative for Security Actors project focuses on “dealing with the past” by providing police tools for re-examination of traumatic events and methods to enhance mental wellbeing and resiliency. Research suggests a link between traumatic experiences and criminal behaviour.[1] Traumatized individuals’ negative encounters with the justice system could further exacerbate this phenomenon. Police officers need to be equipped through a self-healing process and be able to recognize the effects of trauma in the communities they serve. We believe that our program will begin to prepare the police officers for these difficult tasks.

As you know, police officers are exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupation and who experience repeated exposure to traumatic on-the-job practices may suffer psychological problems such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). They are also exposed to stress inherent in their jobs which is considered customary, but which exceeds stress inherent in most other professions. Police respond to every suicide and fatal car accident and arguably exposed to more death and trauma than troops of war. The effects of trauma are often ignored, resulting in high levels of suicide, divorce, and addictions. Often underappreciated, these men and women help make our communities safer every day. Unfortunately working under constant stress and pressure, many police officers suffer from the effects of trauma and some become affected with PTSD. There is very little support given to police officers.

Working with the police service is the beginning of a long journey that aims to address the aforementioned challenges. GSN has a trauma-informed Training of Trainers program for six (6) police officers. These six police officers will work with six (6) GSN trainers to facilitate a healing for self program for 210 police officers in following counties of Nairobi, Mombasa, Kwale, and Kilifi[2].

Trauma-Informed Initiative for Security Actors focuses on “dealing with the past” by providing police tools for re-examination of traumatic events and methods to enhance mental wellbeing and resiliency. Research suggests a link between traumatic experiences and criminal behavior.[3] Traumatized individuals’ negative encounters with the justice system could further exacerbate this phenomenon. Police officers need to be equipped for self-healing and for recognition of trauma in the communities they serve. The program will prepare the police for these difficult tasks.

[1] Eur J “Offending Behavior: the role of trauma and PTSD.” Psychotraumatol. 2012; Published online 2012 Jul 20. doi:  10.3402/ejpt.v3i0.18968

[2] These were the counties that were prioritized by the US State Department.

[3] Eur J “Offending Behavior: the role of trauma and PTSD.” Psychotraumatol. 2012; Published online 2012 Jul 20. doi:  10.3402/ejpt.v3i0.18968

 

consultancy services

Trauma Informed Programming

  • Curriculum Development
  • Programme Design
  • Specialized Consultancies
 

monitoring & evaluation

  • Design & Development of Base Line and Impact Surveys, Focus group
  • Call Centre Services
  • Application Development

Availability

Monday – Friday

 

workshops

  • Trauma Informed Resilience Framework – TIR
  • Trauma Informed Leadership
  • Corporate stress Management
  • Customized workshops