GSN launched its first impact report “Growing Connection, Resiliency and Agency: The impact of community-led trauma-informed peacebuilding in response to violent extremism in Kenya” at the second annual Paris Peace Forum (12 November 2019).

Kumekucha Stories

Trauma-informed peacebuilding innovation becomes a movement driven by local partners. It incorporates low-resource methods building upon cultural practices and traditions. The methodology uses local folktales, case studies, and artwork allowing participants to easily connect and understand complex ideas.

Kumekucha focuses on the transformative power of what is often overlooked – the courage and grace of ordinary people; the communal impulse to be whole again; the will to move past the ravages of violence; and the cultural wealth of traditions and practices of reconciliation. Emphasis is given to narratives which help individuals and groups break the “cycles of violence”, developing community-led peace initiatives. Leadership at all levels is engaged in an effort to support the break-away from a victimhood mentality.

There is a direct link between levels of trauma in vulnerable communities and their challenges faces with access to justice, security, and overall social wellbeing. Persistent insecurity and structural violence result in both individual and collective trauma. Symptoms associated with trauma affects all levels of society including aspects of governance and security. Kumekucha, is community volunteer programs focusing on providing a safe space for participants to explore issues of violence.

A Second Chance

“My son, his friend and my nephew traveled to Somalia, radicalized by an imam who told them that their parents will go to paradise if they joined the cause. My son was

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Healed, Hashim’s Story

I walk freely, happily, openly and boldly down the streets of my community in Likoni with no fear, I don’t have to look over my shoulder, I don’t have to keep scanning

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My Nephew

“My nephew was a suspect in the Machakos County bus bombing, and the day he was arrested he was shot five times by police. When I reached the scene in Majengo, I

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“Free indeed”

Finally, I felt like a man, and it was a great feeling. I was putting food on the table, I was paying my mother’s medical bills, I was educating my sister, we

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“Overcoming loss”

If there had been a word that would have described my son, then anger would have been it. He was angry all the time, angry at everyone and everything, angry at how

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“A new lease on life”

I know all about stigma. It is what happens when you are judged over and over for circumstances you do not control. I know all about being ostracized, my family suffered stigmatization

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